DROPS Nord
DROPS Nord
45% Alpaca, 30% Polyamide, 25% Wool
from 2.70 £ /50g
You can get the yarn to make this pattern from 8.10£. Read more.
DROPS Extra 0-1553
DROPS design: Pattern no-051
Yarn group A
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SIZE:
35/37 - 38/40 - 41/43
Foot length: 22-24-27 cm
Leg height down to heel: Approx. 17-18-19 cm

MATERIALS:
DROPS NORD from Garnstudio (belongs to yarn group A)
100-100-100 g colour 19, forest green
50-50-50 g colour 03, pearl grey

NEEDLES:
DROPS DOUBLE POINTED NEEDLES SIZE 2.5 mm

KNITTING TENSION:
26 stitches in width and 34 rows vertically in stocking stitch = 10 x 10 cm.
NOTE! Remember that needle size is only a suggestion. If you have too many stitches on 10 cm switch to larger needles. If you have too few stitches on 10 cm switch to smaller needles.

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Knitting tension – See how to measure it and why here
Alternative Yarn – See how to change yarns here
Yarn Groups A to F – Use the same pattern and change the yarn here
Yarn usage using an alternative yarn – Use our yarn converter here

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DROPS Nord
DROPS Nord
45% Alpaca, 30% Polyamide, 25% Wool
from 2.70 £ /50g
You can get the yarn to make this pattern from 8.10£. Read more.

Pattern instructions

NOTE: This pattern is written in British English. All measurements in charts are in cm. For conversion from cm to inches - click here. There are different terms for crocheting in British and American English. If this pattern includes crochet, click for "crochet terms" here. For this pattern in American English, please click here.
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EXPLANATION FOR THE PATTERN:

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DECREASE/INCREASE TIP (evenly):
To calculate how to decrease/increase evenly, use the total number of stitches on row (e.g. 72 stitches) and divide stitches by number of decreased/increases to be done (e.g. 8) = 9.
In this example decrease by knitting every 8th and 9th stitch together.
When increasing make in this example 1 yarn over after every 9th stitch. On next round knit yarns over twisted to avoid holes.

PATTERN:
See diagrams A.1 and A.2. Work the entire pattern in stocking stitch.

KNITTING TIP-1 (applies to pattern):
To avoid the garment losing elasticity when working pattern, it is important not to tighten the strands on back side of piece. Switch to a higher needle number when working pattern if the pattern is somewhat tight.

KNITTING TIP-2 (applies to heel):
To get a stronger heel the entire heel and heel decrease can be worked in 2 strands as follows: Use strand inside and outside of ball and work 1 stitch alternately with one and the other strand. This way you get a thicker heel without working with double strand.

DECREASE TIP-1 (applies to mid back on sock):
Decrease 1 stitch on each side of marker thread as follows:
Work until 4 stitches remain before marker and knit 2 together, knit 4 (marker thread is in the middle of these 4 stitches), slip 1 stitch knitwise, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over stitch worked (= 2 stitches decreased).

DECREASE TIP-2 (applies to toe):
Decrease 1 stitch on each side of each marker as follows:
Work until 3 stitches remain before marker, knit 2 together, knit 2 stitches (marker is between these 2 stitches), slip 1 stitch knitwise, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over stitch worked (= 2 stitches decreased).

HEEL DECREASE:
ROW 1 (= right side): Knit until 7-8-8 stitches remain, slip next stitch as if to knit, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over stitch knitted, turn piece.
ROW 2 (= wrong side): Purl until 7-8-8 stitches remain, slip next stitch as if to purl, purl 1, pass slipped stitch over stitch purled, turn piece.
ROW 3 (= right side): Knit until 6-7-7 stitches remain, slip next stitch as if to knit, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over stitch knitted, turn piece.
ROW 4 (= wrong side): Purl until 6-7-7 stitches remain, slip next stitch as if to purl, purl 1, pass slipped stitch over stitch purled, turn piece.
Continue decrease like this with 1 stitch less before each decrease until there are 14-14-16 stitches on needle.

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START THE PIECE HERE:

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SOCKS - SHORT OVERVIEW OF THE PIECE:
Worked in the round on double pointed needles, top down.

SOCK:
Cast on 72-80-80 stitches on double pointed needles size 2.5 mm with colour pearl grey in DROPS Nord.
Work 1 round in stocking stitch. Then work rib in the round (= knit 1/purl 1) for 3 cm.
Work 3 rounds in stocking stitch and decrease at the same time 8 stitches evenly on first round – read INCREASE/DECREASE TIP = 64-72-72 stitches.
Insert a marker thread at the beginning of round (= mid back). Move the marker thread upwards when working - marker thread should be used for decrease mid back on sock.
Read KNITTING TIP-1 and work A.1 in the round (= 8-9-9 repetitions in width of 8 stitches). REMEMBER THE KNITTING TENSION!
When diagram has been worked, continue in stocking stitch with colour forest green. AT THE SAME TIME on 2nd round decrease 0-4-0 stitches evenly = 64-68-72 stitches.
When piece measures 7 cm, decrease 1 stitch on each side of marker thread – read DECREASE TIP-1. Decrease like this every 2-2½-2½ cm 5 times in total = 54-58-62 stitches.
Work until piece measures 17-18-19 cm from cast-on edge (or desired length of leg).
Now work heel as explained below.
Keep the first 13-14-15 stitches on needle for heel, slip the next 28-30-32 stitches on 1 thread without working the stitches (= mid on top of foot), and keep the last 13-14-15 stitches on needle for heel = 26-28-30 stitches for heel. Cut the yarn.
Read KNITTING TIP-2, and work in stocking stitch back and forth over heel stitches with forest green for 5-5½-6 cm. Insert a marker in the middle of last row – marker should be used later to measure the length of foot.
Work in HEEL DECREASE - read explanation above. After heel decrease work next round as follows: Work in stocking stitch over the 14-14-16 heel stitches, pick up 13-14-16 stitches along the side of heel inside 1 edge stitch, work in stocking stitch over the 28-30-32 stitches from thread on top of foot, and pick up 13-14-16 stitches along the other side of heel inside 1 edge stitch = 68-72-80 stitches.
Work until mid under heel, round now begins here.
Insert 1 marker on each side of the 28-30-32 stitches mid on top of foot.
Work in stocking stitch in the round - AT THE SAME TIME decrease on each side of the 28-30-32 stitches on top of foot as follows: Knit the last 2 stitches BEFORE the 28-30-32 stitches on top of foot together and knit the first 2 stitches AFTER the 28-30-32 stitches on top twisted of foot together (= 2 stitches decreased). Decrease like this every other round 8-8-10 times in total = 52-56-60 stitches.
Work until piece measures 14½-15½-17½ cm from marker on heel – measured under foot.
7½-8½-9½ cm remain until finished measurements. Try the sock and work to desired length.
Work 1 round in stocking stitch while increasing 4-0-4 stitches evenly - remember DECREASE/INCREASE TIP = 56-56-64 stitches.
Now work A.2 in the round (= 7-7-8 repetitions in width of 8 stitches). When diagram has been worked vertically, piece measures approx. 18-19-21 cm from marker on heel - measured under foot (approx. 4-5-6 cm remain until finished measurements - work in colour pearl grey to desired length before toe).
Remove the old markers, and insert 1 new marker in each side so that there are 28-28-32 stitches on top of foot and 28-28-32 stitches under foot.
Work in stocking stitch in the round with colour pearl grey, and decrease for toes on each side of both markers - read DECREASE TIP-2 (= 4 stitches decreased). Decrease like this every other round 5-8-10 times in total, and then on every round 5-2-1 times in total = 16-16-20 stitches remain.
On next round knit all stitches together 2 by 2 = 8-8-10 stitches remain. Cut the yarn and pull yarn through the remaining stitches, tighten together and fasten. Sock measures approx. 22-24-27 cm from marker on heel.
Work the other sock the same way.

Diagram

symbols = pearl grey
symbols = forest green
diagram

Each of our patterns has specific tutorial videos to help you.

Do you have a question? See a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ)

Knitting tension is what determines the final measurements of your work, and is usually measured per 10 x 10 cm. It is provided like so: number of stitches in width x number of rows in height - eg: 19 stitches x 26 rows = 10 x 10 cm.

The knitting tension is very individual; some people knit/crochet loosely while others work tightly. You adjust the knitting tension with the needle size, which is why the suggested needle size is only meant as a guide! You need to adjust this (up or down) to ensure that YOUR knitting tension matches the knitting tension provided in the pattern. If you work with a different knitting tension than provided you will have a different yarn consumption, and your work will have different measurements than what the pattern suggests.

The knitting tension also determines which yarns can replace each other. As long as you achieve the same knitting tension you can replace one yarn with another.

See DROPS lesson: How to measure your tension/gauge

See DROPS video: How to make a gauge tension swatch

The required amount of yarn is provided in grams, eg: 450 g. To calculate how many balls you’ll need you first need to know how many grams are in 1 ball (25g, 50g or 100g). This information is available if you click on the individual yarn quality on our pages. Divide the amount required with the amount of each ball. For example, if each ball is 50g (the most common amount), the calculation will be as follows: 450 / 50 = 9 balls.

The important thing when changing from one yarn to another is that the knitting/crochet tension remains the same. This is so that the measurements of the finished piece will be the same as on the sketch provided. It is easier to achieve the same knitting tension using yarns from the same yarn group. It is also possible to work with multiple strands of a thinner yarn to achieve the knitting tension of a thicker one. Please try our yarn converter. We recommend you to always work a test swatch.

Please NOTE: when changing yarn the garment might have a different look and feel to the garment in the photo, due to individual properties and qualities of each yarn.

See DROPS lesson: Can I use a different yarn than the one mentioned in the pattern?

All our yarns are categorised into yarn groups (from A to F) according to thickness and knitting tension – group A contains the thinnest yarns and group F the thickest. This makes it easier for you to find alternative yarns to our patterns, should you wish to switch yarn. All yarns within the same group have a similar knitting tension and can easily replace each other. However, different yarn qualities have different structures and properties which will give the finished work a unique look and feel.

Click here for an overview of the yarns in each yarn group

At the top of all our patterns you’ll find a link to our yarn calculator, which is a helpful tool should you wish to use a different yarn than suggested. By filling in the yarn quality you wish to replace, the amount (in your size) and number of strands, the calculator will present good alternative yarns with the same knitting tension. Additionally it will tell you how much you’ll require in the new qualities and whether you’ll need to work with multiple strands. Most skeins are 50g (some are 25g or 100g).

If the pattern is worked with multiple colours, every colour will have to be calculated separately. Similarly, if the pattern is worked with several strands of different yarns (for example 1 strand Alpaca and 1 strand Kid-Silk) you will have to find alternatives for each, individually.

Click here to see our yarn calculator

Since different yarns have different qualities and textures we have chosen to keep the original yarn in our patterns. However, you can easily find options among our available qualities by using our yarn calculator, or simply pick a yarn from the same yarn group.

It is possible that some retailers still have discontinued yarns in stock, or that someone has a few skeins at home that they would like to find patterns for.

The yarn calculator will provide both alternative yarn as well as required amount in the new quality.

If you think it's hard to decide what size to make, it can be a good idea to measure a garment you own already and like the size of. Then you can pick the size by comparing those measures with the ones available in the pattern's size chart.

You'll find the size chart at the bottom of the pattern.

See DROPS lesson: How to read size chart

The needle size provided in the pattern serves only as a guide, the important thing is to follow the knitting tension. And since knitting tension is very individual, you will have to adjust the needle size to ensure that YOUR tension is the same as in the pattern – maybe you’ll have to adjust 1, or even 2 needle sizes, up or down to achieve the correct tension. For this, we recommend that you work test swatches.

Should you work with a different knitting tension than the one provided, the measurements of the finished garment might deviate from the measurement sketch.

See DROPS lesson: How to measure your tension/gauge

See DROPS video: How to make a tension/gauge swatch

Working a garment top-down provides more flexibility and room for personal adjustment. For example it is easier to try the garment on while working, as well as making adjustments to length of yoke and shoulder caps.

The instructions are carefully explaining every step, in the correct order. Diagrams are adjusted to the knitting direction and are worked as usual.

The diagram depicts all rows/rounds, and every stitch seen from the right side. It is read from bottom to top, from right to left. 1 square = 1 stitch.

When working back and forth, every other row is worked from the right side and every other row is worked from the wrong side. When working from the wrong side, the diagram will have to be worked reversed: from left to right, knit stitches are purled, purl stitches are knit etc.

When working in the round every round is worked from the right side and the diagram are worked from right to left on all rounds.

See DROPS lesson: How to read knitting diagrams

The diagram depicts all rows/rounds, and every stitch seen from the right side. It is worked from bottom to top, from right to left.

When working back and forth every other row is worked from the right side: from right to left and every other row is worked from the wrong side: from left to right.

When working in the round, every row in the diagram are worked from the right side, from right to left.

When working a circular diagram you start in the middle and work your way outwards, counter clockwise, row by row.

The rows usually start with a given number of chain stitches (equivalent to the height of the following stitch), this will either be depicted in the diagram or explained in the pattern.

See DROPS lesson: How to read crochet diagrams

Instructions for working several diagrams after each other on the same row/round, will often be written like so: “work A.1, A.2, A.3 a total of 0-0-2-3-4 times". This means you work A.1 once, then A.2 is worked once, and A.3 is repeated (in width) the number of times provided for your size – in this case like so: S = 0 times, M = 0 times, L=2 times, XL= 3 times and XXL = 4 times.

The diagrams are worked as usual: begin with the first row in A.1, then work the first row in A.2 etc.

See DROPS lesson: How to read knitting diagrams

See DROPS lesson: How to read crochet diagrams

The total width of the garment (from wrist-to-wrist) will be larger in the larger sizes, despite the actual sleeves being shorter. The larger sizes have longer sleeve caps and wider shoulders, so there will be a good fit in all sizes.

The measurement sketch/schematic drawing provides information regarding the full length of the garment. If it’s a jumper or a jacket the length is measured from the highest point on the shoulder closest to the neckline, and straight down to the bottom of the garment. It is NOT measured from the tip of shoulder. Similarly, the length of yoke is measured from the highest point on the shoulder and down to where yoke is split into body and sleeves.

On a jacket measures are never taken along bands, unless specifically stated. Always measure inside band stitches when measuring the length.

See DROPS lesson: How to read a schematic drawing

Diagrams are often repeated on the round or in height. 1 repeat is the diagram the way it appears in the pattern. If it says to work 5 repeats of A.1 in the round, then you work A.1 a total of 5 times after/next to each other in the round. If it says to work 2 repeats of A.1 vertically/in height you work the entire diagram once, then begin again at the start and work the entire diagram one more time.

Chain stitches are slightly narrower than other stitches and to avoid working the cast-on edge too tight, we simply chain more stitches to begin with. The stitch count will be adjusted on the following row to fit the pattern and measurement sketch.

The rib edge is more elastic and will contract slightly compared to, for example, stocking stitch. By increasing before the rib edge, you avoid a visible difference in width between the rib edge and the rest of the body.

It’s very easy to cast off too tightly, and by making yarn overs while casting off (and simultaneously casting these off) you avoid a too tight cast off edge.

See DROPS video: How to bind off with yarn overs (yo)

To achieve an even increase (or decrease) you can increase on, for example: every 3rd and 4th row alternately, like so: work 2 rows and increase on the 3rd row, work 3 rows and increase on the 4th. Repeat this until the increase is complete.

See DROPS lesson: Increase or decrease 1 st on every 3rd and 4th row alternately

Should you prefer to work in the round instead of back and forth, you may of course adjust the pattern. You’ll need to add steeks mid-front (usually 5 stitches), and follow the instructions. When you would normally turn and work from the wrong side, simply work across the steek and continue in the round. At the end you’ll cut the piece open, pick up stitches to work bands, and cover the cut edges.

See DROPS video: How to knit steeks and cut open

Should you prefer to work back and forth instead of in the round, you may of course adjust the pattern so you work the pieces separately and then assemble them at the end. Divide the stitches for the body in 2, add 1 edge stitch in each side (for sewing) and work the front and back pieces separately.

See DROPS lesson: Can I adapt a pattern for circular needles into straight needles?

Pattern repeats can vary slightly in the different sizes, in order to get the correct proportions. If you’re not working the exact same size as the garment in the photo, yours might deviate slightly. This has been carefully developed and adjusted so that the complete impression of the garment is the same in all sizes.

Make sure to follow instructions and diagrams for your size!

If you have found a pattern you like which is available in women’s size it’s not very difficult to convert it to men’s size. The biggest difference will be the length of sleeves and body. Start working on the women size that you think would fit across the chest. The additional length will be worked right before you cast off for the armhole/sleeve cap. If the pattern is worked top-down you can add the length right after the armhole or before the first decrease on sleeve.

Regarding additional yarn amount, this will depend on how much length you add, but it is better with a skein too many than too few.

All yarns will have excess fibres (from production) that might come off as lint or shedding. Brushed yarns (ie hairier yarns) have more of these loose, excess fibres, causing more shedding.

Shedding also depends on what is worn under or over the garment, and whether this pulls at the yarn fibres. It’s therefore not possible to guarantee that there will be no shedding

Below are some tips on how to get the best result when working with hairier yarns:

1. When the garment is finished (before you wash it) shake it vigorously so the looser hairs come off. NOTE: do NOT use a lint roller, brush or any method that pulls at the yarn.

2. Place the garment in a plastic bag and put it in your freezer - the temperature will cause the fibres to become less attached to each other, and excess fibres will come off easier.

3. Leave in the freezer for a few hours before taking it out and shaking it again.

4. Wash the garment according to the instructions on the yarn label.

Pilling is a natural process that happens to even the most exclusive of fibers. It's a natural sign of wear and tear that is hard to avoid, and that is most visible in high friction areas of your garment like a sweater's arms and cuffs.

You can make your garment look as new by removing the pilling, using a fabric comb or a pill/lint remover.

Still can't find the answer you need? Then scroll down and leave your question so one of our experts can try to help you. This will be done normally within 5 to 10 working days.
In the meantime, you can read the questions and answers that others have left to this pattern or join the DROPS Workshop on Facebook to get help from fellow knitters/crocheters!

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Post a comment to pattern DROPS Extra 0-1553

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Comments / Questions (13)

country flag Marion wrote:

80 Maschen anzuschlagen ist viel zu weit für einen Socken, das ergibt eher einen Stulpen. Ich musste wieder aufribbeln.

13.12.2023 - 11:41

country flag Enrica wrote:

Buonasera, A pag.4/7 c'e' scritto che, a fine diagramma, bisogna continuare a maglia rasata con il colore verde foresta per 7 cm. Il filo grigio grigio perla devo portarmelo dietro lungo tutti i 7 cm o devo tagliarlo? Grazie

02.12.2023 - 17:14

DROPS Design answered:

Buongiorno Erica, il grigio perla è necessario solo all'inizio e alla fine, durante la lavorazione dei diagrammi: può tagliarlo e ripartire quando richiesto. Buon lavoro!

04.12.2023 - 17:01

country flag Eneica wrote:

Buonasera, Nella sezione "Inizio lavoro - calze" , ottavo rigo, c'e' scritto " inserire un segnapunti all'inizio del giro (= centro dietro). Cosa significa "centro dietro"? In che senso? Che significa "il segnapunti dev'essere usato x le diminuzioni al centro dietro (?) Della calza? Grazie

27.11.2023 - 23:07

DROPS Design answered:

Buonasera Enrica, il segnapunti serve ad indicare il centro dietro della calza e verrà usato per indicare i punti in cui diminuire le maglie in seguito. Buon lavoro!

30.11.2023 - 22:51

country flag Lily wrote:

Could I modify this pattern just so that the repeat takes either 6 or 10 stitches?.. I love these but my socks require 60 stitches and I won't be able to knit them evenly this way

27.11.2023 - 22:19

DROPS Design answered:

Dear Lily, the diagrams are worked over 8 sts, this means you need a number of stitches divisible by 8 to get the pattern working, if your tension is different than the one in our pattern, you will have to adjust either the pattern or the tension to make it working. Happy knitting!

28.11.2023 - 08:48

country flag Leonie wrote:

Hello, Casting on the stated 80 St creates a way too big cuff, even 72 would be too big with the suggested yarn and needle for the smaller size. I thought it was just me but a lot of other people casted on 56st -68st on Ravelry for this pattern. This might need to be reviewed.

24.11.2023 - 17:32

country flag JUDITH A STRUCK wrote:

How do you determine how much to purchase. For example, the requirements show 50/50/50 or 100/100/100. Does that mean that you should purchase 3 of each of these colors? I recently purchased only 2 balls for socks, but I might need 3 if I am interpreting this code correctly.

28.01.2023 - 16:22

DROPS Design answered:

Dear Judith, the amount normally depends on the size you are working and the pattern used. The number sequences indicate the amount of each colour you need for each size (the first number for the smallest size, the last number for the largest size). In this case, you need 100 gr of nº 19 and 50gr of nº03, regardless of the size you are working. So you need 2 balls of nº19 and 1 ball of nº03. Happy knitting!

29.01.2023 - 20:55

country flag Mirjam Goudswaard wrote:

Klopt dit wel, de boord is al 3cm hoog en 7cm is de een na laatste regel van de dennebpompjes het patroon A1. En mijn stekenverhouding klopt wel precies! Hoor graag van U. Met vriendelijke groet, Mirjam Goudswaard

26.10.2022 - 13:32

DROPS Design answered:

Dag Mirjam,

A.1 heeft 12 naalden in de hoogte. Bij een stekenverhouding van 34 naalden tricotsteek in de hoogte, zit je dan op een hoogte van 3,4 cm en met de boord van 3 cm in totaal op 6,4 cm. Dan nog 3 naalden erbij waar je meerdert vlak na de boord. Volgens mij zit je dan ongeveer op 7 cm. Als het niet precies uitkomt, dan kun je gewoon vlak na A.1 beginnen met meerderen.

27.10.2022 - 20:53

country flag Mirjam Goudswaard wrote:

Goeden avond, Vanaf waar wordt de 7cm gemeten, vanaf de onderkant van de boord of vanaf waar je verder breid met groen? Groetjes Mirjam

24.10.2022 - 23:51

DROPS Design answered:

Dag Mirjam,

Dit is de totale hoogte, dus vanaf het opzetten.

26.10.2022 - 09:05

country flag Estrella wrote:

Hola ,he hecho los calcetines de las ovejitas pero cuando en el cambio de color en negro hay más de cinco puntos me queda muy tirante la lana y si lo pongo flojo para poder luego poner el calcetín se ve el punto negro muy feo. Como puedo hacerlo? Ahora estoy haciendo los calcetines de los árboles verdes y hay una vuelta que ocurre lo mismo. Como puedo solucionar este problema ?gracias

05.10.2022 - 10:24

DROPS Design answered:

Hola Estrella, debajo del patrón tienes dos vídeos sobre cómo trabajar la técnica Fair isle (dependiendo de si trabajas con la técnica continental o americana). Consiste en ir cruzando el hilo cada 3 puntos. De esta manera, el hilo no queda muy colgado (como al cambiar cada 5) ni demasiado prieto. Asegurate también de controlar bien la tensión del tejido; si el hilo negro se ve desde atrás es porque la tensión de tejido está más flojo de lo habitual. También se recomienda usar una aguja algo más grande al trabajar con esta técnica para que el dibujo quede mejor sin que se tense demasiado la labor.

09.10.2022 - 22:48

country flag Vervier Véronique wrote:

Bonjour, je tricote des chaussettes depuis peu avec votre fil Fabel, c'est un vrai plaisir. Mais je ne trouve pas de patron pour commencer les chaussettes par la pointe ( toe up ) en taille enfant . Pouvez-vous m'aider ? Merci. Véronique

01.10.2022 - 10:07

DROPS Design answered:

Bonjour Mme Vervier, nous n'avons effectivement pas de modèles enfant en toe up, vous pourrez peut-être vous inspirer de nos modèles femmes de cette catégorie. Bon tricot!

03.10.2022 - 08:29